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Chief Aje of the Bongouanou Chiefdom
Here are some recent pictures taken by us whilst hunting for tribal treasures across West Africa
(NOTE - The Rams head figure, Baule Janus Wedding belly mask and the 2 large Baule Chiefs Spirit spouses were SOLD
when they were found in the villages in Cote D'Ivoire and form part of the 'Haese Collection detailed in the collections section)
The other pieces and others will be listed on the website soon, or will be available to view in our Paris Gallery in Summer of 2014)









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SOLD 1468 Baule Goli House mask Large , Cote D'Ivoire Property of Chief Aje

1468 Baule Goli House mask Large, from Chief Aje of Cote D'Ivoire

H104 W66 D09.
SOLD 1467 Baule Goli Sun Mask, Cote D'Ivoire Property of Chief Aje

1467 Baule Goli Sun Mask, from Chief Aje of Cote D'Ivoire

Used outside his home during Goli Festival ceremonies

C20 Late

Approximate dimensions
H104 W68 D9cm
SOLD 1298 Baule Leopard Helmet Mask, Chief Aje, Cote D'Ivoire

Baule Leopard Helmet Mask

Used by Chief Aje during ceremonies when Baoule warriors were present, to show that
he was also a brave warrior. The Baoule believe that the leopard is the bravest and
strongest animal on the earth. It is a magnificent piece which pictures cannot do justice to.
SOLD 1149 Baule Chiefs Inauguration Pot - Property of sitting Chief Aje, Cote D'Ivoire SOLD

SOLD

Baule Chiefs Inauguration Pot - Property of sitting Chief Aje, Cote D'Ivoire - 85cm


Carved for this ceremony in 1962. Materials - wood, local shells, beads, kaolin pigment

Reduced in Price October 2014

Rare opportunity to take possession of an inauguration pot used at the appointment
of a sitting Baule Chief from a village between the Komoe and Sasandra rivers.

A stunning celebration pot used to house delicacies offered to dignitaries at the ceremony.
After the ceremony, it was presented to the Chiefs mother who became the owner.

The seated figure at the bottom is of Chief Aje's mother, seen sitting on an Ashanti stool
reminiscent of 'Queen Abla Pokou' who founded the Baule tribe. She is seen holding her
breasts to show the pain she has endured for her son (the new Chief). This is to show that
she commands respect from the tribe for producing their Chief. An efigy of her own Mother
is shown above her on the pot. The head on the lid of the pot represents Chief Aje as a young
man (or son). This is the last time he would be represented without a long beard in more
traditional carvings. During the ceremony of inauguration, all dignitaries took a delicacy from
inside this pot, and then gently kicked the lid of the pot further away from the pot, to symbolise
their agreement that the young face is no longer suitable for the new Chief.
From this time, no one was to see the pot again outside of the mothers house.
Chiefs mother passed, and he wants to sell this pot which is very special to him, to help
his village and people at a time of great need.

Note: This pot still belongs to Chief Aje, we are merely selling it for him. He has stipulated
that it is to be sold to an 'individual' of whom he approves ONLY. Apologies in advance.

Appraisal and information by Steve Thanni Oct 2014
NEW CUSTODIAN - Ashanti Queen Aura Abla Pokou - Chief Aje, Cote D'Ivoire - PRIVATE (Exhibition Only).



Ashanti Queen Aura Abla Pokou - Private property of Chief Aje, Cote D'Ivoire - PRIVATE (Exhibition Only)

This item is not available for sale at this time.

This exquisite figure was carved by the renowned master carver 'Ngramie' for the father of the current
sitting Chief 'Aje'. It represents the Akan 'Ashanti' queen Pokou before she was forced to flee her land
in search of a new home in the Ivory Coast. The figure sees her in a seated position upon her ancestral
royal stool with a design similar to the adinkra symbol of 'Gye-Nyame' (translates to 'If not for God').
She wears traditional Akan 'kente' cloth and royal beads around her neck.
Around her left leg is a 'black mamba' snake (one of the most feared in West Africa) and Queen Pokou is
holding its head in her hand totally unafraid. In her other hand, she holds a bunch of dried raffia grass in a
ceremonial pose. This figure is quite unique because it depicts Queen Pokou as a young woman without
the famous first child whom she sacrificed. Also she is not pregnant as is a more common efigy.

An incredibly beautiful statue and a very rare piece which is a focal point of Chief Ajes families collection.
This figure is very close to Chief Aje and was always by his side at important events of the Chief. He is big
advocate of keeping the history and traditions of the Baoule tribe and their founder Queen Pokou in the public eye.

This piece is only available for exhibitions at museums and tribal art fairs by accredited art dealers.

This remains the property of 'Chief Aje of Bongouanou' and is not for sale. It has been offered to
Fine Tribal Gallery for the purposes of Exhibiting rare and important tribal art pieces to show
the beauty of the art only.

Exhibitions -

2012 Collection Museum (Main feature in Celebrations of African Women Week)
2013 'Bruneaf' Brussels
2014 'London Olympia Tribal Antiques fair' UK

**This piece is available for exhibition by accredited Galleries or Museums**

For further information about this piece please send enquiries to info@finetribalgallery.com
NEW CUSTODIAN - Baule Chiefs Janus Rams 'Secret' Pot, Cote D'Ivoire - Property of Chief Aje of Bongouanou. Exhibitions only

Baule Chiefs Janus Rams 'Secret' Pot, Cote D'Ivoire (Chief Aje of Bongouanou)

Used to house spiritual herbs and offerings during ceremonies of the 'Secret' Rams mask dancers
held only at night at funerals or special occasions. This pot became the property of the sitting Chief
who presides over such dances in the village.

This remains the property of 'Chief Aje of Bongouanou' and is not for sale. It has been offered to
Fine Tribal Gallery for the purposes of Exhibiting rare and important tribal art pieces to show
the beauty of the art only.



**This piece is available for exhibition by accredited Galleries or Museums**

For further information about this piece please send enquiries to info@finetribalgallery.com
NEW CUSTODIAN - Baule Chiefs Turtle Pot, Cote D'Ivoire - Property of Chief Aje of Bongouanou. Exhibitions only

Baule Chiefs Turtle Pot, Cote D'Ivoire - Property of Chief Aje of Bongouanou. Exhibitions only

The baule tribe like their Akan ancestors believe that the Turtle has great 'Power' and strength.
They also believe turtles have the ability to communicate with the Spirit world of the Asie Osu.

Such pots tended to only be carved for 'sitting' chiefs to use as offering pots for important guests.

This pot was used for many years by Chief Aje, at funerals and weddings. The pot would be filled
with kola nuts and other delicacies to be offered to dignitaries or important visitors to the ceremony.



This remains the property of 'Chief Aje of Bongouanou' and is not for sale. It has been offered to
Fine Tribal Gallery for the purposes of Exhibiting rare and important tribal art pieces to show
the beauty of the art only.

Exhibitions -

2013 'Bruneaf' Brussels
2014 'London Olympia Tribal Antiques fair' UK

**This piece is available for exhibition by accredited Galleries or Museums**

For further information about this piece please send enquiries to info@finetribalgallery.com

NEW CUSTODIAN - Baule Chief dancers Rams Headresses, Cote D'Ivoire (Property of Chief Aje of Bongouanou) Exhibitions only

Baule Chief dancers Rams Headdresses, Cote D'Ivoire (Property of Chief Aje 'Gyamanhene' of Bongouanou)

Stunningly beautiful Headdresses from a village near Bongouanou in Cote D'Ivoire.

These 2 masterpieces of craftmanship were carved by a famous master carver of the time called 'Ngrami'
who carved almost exclusively for Chiefs and important elders. Although there were many apprentices of Ngrami,
one can tell the difference in the quality of the pieces he carved very easily.

Both of these headdresses were carved specifically for the inauguration of Chief Aje. When the Chief is inaugurated
he agrees to preside over the secret Rams mask dancers. During part of the ceremony the two most senior elders
wear the special 'Chiefs' Rams headresses and sit either side of the new Chief. These 2 headresses above were
the actual ones worn when Chief Aje took over. During secret dances of old (held only at night) Chief Aje wore the
special 'Janus' (double headed) rams headdress. His nephew who will inherit the Chiefs seat after him, wore the
other headdress with the single ram). These dances are sadly no longer performed regularly in the villages.
Valuation by Anoff-Sylla Kwekudee of the Tribal Art Museum in Geneva 2012 - £8000 pair

This remains the property of 'Chief Aje of Bongouanou' and is not for sale. It has been offered to
Fine Tribal Gallery for the purposes of Exhibiting rare and important tribal art pieces to show
the beauty of the art only.

Exhibitions -

2013 'Bruneaf' Brussels
2014 'London Olympia Tribal Antiques fair' UK

**This piece is available for exhibition by accredited Galleries or Museums**

For further information about this piece please send enquiries to info@finetribalgallery.com
NEW CUSTODIAN - Rare Baule Chiefs inauguration mask, Cote D'Ivoire - Property of Chief Aje of Bongouanou. Exhibitions only

Incredibly Rare Baule Chiefs inauguration mask, Cote D'Ivoire - Property of Chief Aje of Bongouanou

Absolutely stunning inauguration mask worn by 'Chief Aje' at his appointment as the sitting Chief.
The mask is beautifully coloured with red and blue kaolin pigments representing fire and water
(in Akan mythology the sun and the sea). Above and below the mask are symbolic rams horns which
surround the entire face of the mask. This symbolizes the Chiefs acceptance of leading the secret society
of dancers within the Baule village. On top of the mask is a 'sitting' figure depicting the outgoing Chief (in this
unusual case, it is Chief Ajes Father). The male figure is sitting to show he is tired. There is no royal akan stool
for him to sit on, because effectively, he has been 'destooled' by the new Chief.
A standing figure below of a woman is the Chiefs mother, whose strength is such that single handed,
she can raise the Chief and her husband. This shows the incredible power associated with Baoule women
as believed by the men of the tribe. This mask was presented to the mother of the new Chief after
the inauguration, by the elders of the village in honour of the sacrifices through her life on behalf of her son,
and their new Chief. A truly stunning piece.

(Please note - When the Chief is inaugurated he agrees to preside over the secret Rams mask dancers.
During part of the ceremony the two most senior elders wear the special 'Chiefs' Rams headresses and
sit either side of the new Chief. These 2 headresses above were the actual ones worn when Chief Aje
took over. During secret dances of old (held only at night) Chief Aje wore the special 'Janus' (double headed)
rams headdress. His nephew who will inherit the Chiefs seat after him, wore the other headdress with the
single ram). These dances are sadly no longer regularly performed in the villages, and have not for nearly 20 years.



This remains the property of 'Chief Aje of Bongouanou' and is not for sale. It has been offered to
Fine Tribal Gallery for the purposes of Exhibiting rare and important tribal art pieces to show
the beauty of the art only.

Exhibitions -

2013 'Bruneaf' Brussels
2014 'London Olympia Tribal Antiques fair' UK

**This piece is available for exhibition by accredited Galleries or Museums**

For further information about this piece please send enquiries to info@finetribalgallery.com
NEW CUSTODIAN - Queen Aura Abla Pokou child portrait figure EXHIBITION PIECE ONLY Property of Chief Aje Gyamanhene

MUSEUM EXHIBITION PIECE ONLY - NOT FOR SALE

Queen Aura Abla Pokou statue. Carved for Chief Dula, the father of the current sitting Chief
of the Baule province of Bongoualou 'Chief Aje Suleman' in approximately 1908.

This an exquisite piece. It depicts the Akan Queen Aura sitting upon a 'Baule funeral stool'
in mourning for her dead son. The 'dead' infant baby on her lap lying peacefully asleep.

According to the legend she was forced to sacrifice her only child and heir to save her people,
by offering his life to the Komoe river in order to gain safe passage across it.

This sacrifice inspired her people to live unselfish lives and to value family above all worldly goods
or desires. As the child drowned, Aura cried "Baou le" which in the Ashanti language means -
'Child is dead'. When her followers settled in their new land, they called themselves 'the Baule'.
This new land is now known as Cote D'Ivoire (formerly Ivory Coast)

It has exceptional form and emotion. She sits proudly and regent offering her dead son to be
seen by all before her. Her eyes are open but you do not see her eyes as she is meditating.
Her coiffure is simple and yet elegant, and her long neck bears the traditional Akan markings of royalty.

She displays the scarifications of her Akan roots, but also the new designs created by the Baule
to show allegiance to the Queen.

Although this is a funerary figure and represents a sad occasion, it is also a figure of beauty
and elegance.


This remains the property of 'Chief Aje of Bongouanou' and is not for sale. It has been offered to
Fine Tribal Gallery for the purposes of Exhibiting rare and important tribal art pieces to show
the beauty of the art only.

Exhibitions -

2013 'Bruneaf' Brussels
2014 'London Olympia Tribal Antiques fair' UK

**This piece is available for exhibition by accredited Galleries or Museums**

For further information about this piece please send enquiries to info@finetribalgallery.com